The holidays can be a time of intense emotions, not to mention the added pressure of heading into a new year wrought withthe expectations of new heights to scale, achievements to cross off, the better person you want to become…

In the midst of all this, have you ever noticed your heart’s true capacity for emotion? Or its ability to cradle multiple emotions at once?

Over the past few weeks, some emotionally challenging circumstances have led me to contemplate the unwelcome gifts in life yet again – unwelcome because they bring with them pain, discomfort, fear, apathy, anger, and a host of other emotions that I/we normally do our utmost to avoid. Gifts because – in time – they teach you. They teach you, whether you like it or not, more about yourself, about how to live and be in more harmony on the inside through the external ups and downs of life, how to honor that which is true to you.

And since I didn’t have the capacity to publish my November newsletter in the midst of all this, I wanted to share some snowballing insights with you this month and invite you to go a little deeper yourself during this season of taking stock and moving forward.

The Presence – and Presents – of Opposites

The two prevalent emotions my heart has been cradling are grief and gratitude. Quite fitting, I think, given we are both into winter – the season of endings – and the season of giving thanks. And, interestingly, as opposite as they seem, they have been traveling through me hand in hand.

What are the prevalent emotions you’ve been cradling lately?

Are you allowing yourself to acknowledge what you’re really feeling, especially if it’s uncomfortable?

And can you see the shadow or glimmer of the opposite emotion in that which you’re feeling?

Perhaps a flash of hope or strength in your deepest sorrow?

Or a figment of fear when you are celebrating that achievement you’ve worked so hard to attain?

So, why grief? And gratitude?

Because I’ve been surrendering more to the acknowledgement that there’s a natural cycle to life. Many cycles coexist:  energetic, physical, human, biological, astrological, emotional…

Within all these cycles, however, there is a common theme:  birth and death.

The grief brought on by death or the loss of something or someone dear.

The gratitude for the birth of possibilities this loss creates, or for the as yet-unknown growth and path this loss will yield to, with trust.

Polar opposites, right? And therein lies the beauty. It is this tension between opposites that creates the world we experience.

Each exists because the other one does too. To deny one is to deny the other.

I love deserts. You know: sand dunes. There’s a term used to describe the force of opposites that creates the perfect peak on a sand dune: the angle of repose. It’s the steepest angle at which loose material like sand (emotions) can hold steady and stable thanks to an exact and opposing force from the other side. Balance. Relief. Rest. Yielding with the trust that you will be held up.

The caveat is, the angle of repose will always shift.

Emotional Shifts

Emotions – both “good” and “bad” – can be uncomfortable and stifling if you don’t allow them to shift. To move.

To allow emotions to move, you must first acknowledge them. Then let them be, without judgement. And then release them. With this type of movement your life is better able to flow and find a new angle of repose – the one that is right, right now.

Allowing this kind of movement can indeed be challenging.

Case in point:  the past few years have been an increasingly rapid cycle of mini and not-so-mini births and deaths for me:

Death: my former career
Birth: my new Big Work

Death: old belief systems which no longer serve me
Birth: new belief systems paving the way

Death: my old body, one wrought with pain
Birth: my new body, one that is pain-free and incredibly resilient

Death: attachment to things, places, expectations, and people and to the fear of letting go
Birth: more freedom to let things, places, expectations and people come and go, with love

It’s been a lot of work.

Letting Go to Let It In

Without allowing for opposites, and movement through stifling emotions, and yielding with trust, I venture that the above births would not have been forthcoming. At least not as “easily.” (Ha!)

And, truly, every single moment is the perfect marriage of death and birth, creating the realm of possibility that makes itself known to us in small, quiet ways. And sometimes in massively disruptive ways. Can it be that we can allow and be at ease with both?

How are your emotions pointing you towards letting go of what’s ready to expire… or towards welcoming that new thought, way of being, or truth into your life?

Which possibilities are you ready to make room for?

I invite you to take a few moments to reflect and let me know by sharing a comment below.

And with that, I wish for you a holiday season and new year of welcome possibilities, love, health, and all that which your heart and soul truly desire.

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Want to share this article? You may, as long as you include the following blurb with it in its entirety:

Simla Somturk Wickless, MBA, CHC, CNE, is the founder of Delicious Health LLC. Simla is a health, nutrition, and balanced living coach whose mission is to transform Busy Bodies into healthy, Balanced beings TM. Simla loves working with women entrepreneurs, professionals, and autoimmune clients to help them double their energy, tame their stress, get to their natural weight without dieting, and take back control of their health to live intensely pleasurable and impactful lives. Learn more  at www.EnjoyDeliciousHealth.com or www.DeliciousHealthBlog.com.

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What advice would you give to your younger self?

I was asked this question in an interview a couple of years ago and felt like revisiting it today. Here’s what I would say:

Don’t get lost in other peoples’ noise and in the race that leads to nowhere.

Work will inevitably expand to take up the space that you give it. Take the blinders off and establish some boundaries so you can enjoy your life and those you love to the fullest.

Remember to breathe. Deeply.

Call home more often.

Remember who you are and check in with your wise inner voice every day for the guidance you seek. It’s always there for you, no matter what.

Chill out a little!

Be kinder to yourself.

Your life is and will always be imperfectly perfect just the way it is. You are perfect, just the way you are.

I love you!

What would you say?

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October is National Liver Awareness Month. Are you ready to love your liver?

I love mine. Dearly. After reading this, you’ll love yours too.

About 5.5 years ago, when my health pretty much exploded and I was lost in the maze of conventional medicine, one of the complications I had was medication-induced hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) and pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas).

Trust me, it sucked.

Your Magnificent (and funny-looking) Liver

No thanks to that and a cluster of many, many other health issues, I was laid up in bed for months. I had to leave my career and go on disability for the ensuing two years.

Had I known what I know now, I could have healed my liver pronto, and possibly even prevented its demise in the first place. But, alas, hindsight, as they say, is 20-20. Today, I never take my liver for granted.

Anyway – here’s a primer on your liver and how to take great care of it.

Why Your Liver is Magnificent

Shaped like a football and resting underneath the ribs, the liver is the largest and one of the hardest-working organs in the human body. It is a builder, destroyer, garbage collector, recycler, commander, and guardian of your overall health. It performs over 500 (!) different functions and its level of performance impacts every other organ system in
your body.

This dense organ, which is part of the gastrointestinal system and weighs about 3-4 pounds in adults, churns out thirteen thousand chemicals and two thousand enzyme systems to perform its duties. The liver is capable of functioning and regenerating even after 70% of its abilities have been damaged, and for good reason:  we wouldn’t be able to live longer than 24 hours if it weren’t.

Functions of the Liver

The liver serves multiple wide-reaching functions in the body, such as:

 

Threats to the Liver

One of the reasons the liver works so hard is because it is constantly exposed to many factors considered threats by the body, including but not limited to:

 

Taking Care of Your Liver

The liver is incredibly resilient. It has to be – our lives depend on it! Your daily choices impact the health and functional ability of your liver. Below are some basic tips to follow for optimal liver health.

What to Do

What to Avoid

Long live your liver!

References

Bauman, Edward, M.Ed., Ph.D., Crystal, Cathy, B.Ed., N.C., and Richard, Ramona, B.A., N.C., Nutrition Consultant Handbook: Distance Learning Edition: Version L, Bauman College Press, Penngrove, CA, 2009

Bennett, Peter, ND, Barrie, Stephen, ND, and Faye, Sara, 7-Day Detox Miracle: Revitalize Your Mind and Body with This Safe and Effective Life-Enhancing Program,
New York, NY, Three Rivers Press, 2001.

LaValle, James B., R.Ph., CCN, ND, Lundin Yale, Stacy, RN, BSN, 9 Keys to Optimal Health: Cracking the Metabolic Code, Basic Health Publications, Inc., Laguna Beach,
CA, 2004.

Lipski, Elizabeth, Ph.D., CCN, Digestive Wellness, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, 2005.

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Want to share this article? You may, as long as you include the following blurb with it in its entirety:

Simla Somturk Wickless, MBA, CHC, CNE, is the founder of Delicious Health LLC. Simla is a health, nutrition, and balanced living coach whose mission is to transform Busy Bodies into healthy, Balanced beings TM. Simla loves working with women entrepreneurs, professionals, and autoimmune clients to help them double their energy, tame their stress, get to their natural weight without dieting, and take back control of their health to live intensely pleasurable and impactful lives. Learn more  at www.EnjoyDeliciousHealth.com or www.DeliciousHealthBlog.com.

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Curried Quinoa with Cauliflower & Artichokes

by Simla on October 19, 2011

Do you ever stop and admire the cauliflower and broccoli you see at the farmer’s market or in the grocery store? No? Well, maybe you’ll want to after reading these facts and trying the recipe below.

Welcome. Meet the cruciferous (brassica) family of veggies, which includes: broccoli, broccoli rabe, broccolini, cauliflower (white, orange, green, and purple), all cabbages (white, purple, napa, etc.), brussels sprouts, collard greens, and all kinds of kale.

The cruciferous family, if they were human, would be a very loving and nurturing family. No dysfunction here. Here’s why:

The other star ingredient in the recipe below is artichoke. Artichoke is from the thistle family, as is milk thistle (which is known for its powerful liver-supporting and reparative qualities). Artichoke is known to:

Convinced this stuff is good for you? Now, find out how delicious these healthy veggies can be by making this recipe:

Curried Quinoa with Cauliflower & Artichokes
adapted from Jonathan Miller’s recipe on http://www.mariquita.com

Generously serves 2.

Ingredients

1 cup cooked quinoa – try ivory or red quinoa for more color
1 small head of cauliflower, rinsed and cut into florets. Include the more tender parts of the stem, too.
1/4 – 1/3 cup peas
1 shallot, peeled and minced
1/3 – 1/2 can marinated artichoke hearts
3 TBS lemon juice
1/2 TBS curry powder
4 TBS minced cilantro
2 TBS olive oil
Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

Directions

  1. Cook your quinoa and allow to cool slightly.
  2. Steam the cauliflower, broccoli, and peas to the texture you like.
  3. Make a vinaigrette with the shallot, lemon juice, curry powder, a bit of cilantro, and olive oil.
  4. Fold that into the quinoa with the vegetables and add additional sea salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Serve warm, topped with the artichokes.

Variations

Enjoy!

***

You may share this recipe freely as long as you include this complete paragraph with it:

This recipe is shared with you courtesy of Simla Somturk Wickless, MBA, CHC, CNE, founder of Delicious Health LLC. Simla is a health, nutrition, and balanced living coach whose mission is to transform Busy Bodies into healthy, Balanced beings TM. Simla loves working with women entrepreneurs, professionals, and autoimmune clients to help them double their energy, tame their stress, get to their ideal weight without dieting, and take back control of their health to live intensely pleasurable and impactful lives. Learn more  at www.EnjoyDeliciousHealth.com or www.DeliciousHealthBlog.com .

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Talk. Not Treats: A Powerful Manifesto

by Simla on October 13, 2011

My brilliant client, entrepreneur Karri Flatla, recently penned a manifesto borne from her personal frustration as a parent to two young children, as a participant in a society that tends to take the easy way out by bribing with “treats” versus taking the time to talk and get to the core of what children (and the rest of us!) REALLY need.

I just read it and have massive goose bumps. Well said, Karri.

Here it is: Talk. Not Treats.

How do you handle the “treats vs. talk” situations you find yourself (and your children) in?

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I’ve been traveling a lot lately. And eating well while traveling on the road can be a challenge, especially when working around food allergies or intolerances. Even I don’t always want to take the trouble of organizing myself well enough to take home-prepared travel meals along with me, or I end up having to cobble a meal together to avoid my food intolerances.

I also love to scope out new food products everywhere I go:  in corner stores, grocery stores, restaurants, coffee shops, airports… you name it. Well, I did a double take at the Baltimore-Washington Airport this week as I zeroed in on a brilliant food option that made my heart sing (yes, I get easily excited by food): the perfect travel food!

Voila: Go Picnic’s Ready-to-Eat Meals.

Here’s why I think this is a great option for pretty much any travel – food sensitivities or not:

Upsides:

Disclaimer: I am not financially compensated for saying any of these things. This is purely my unadulterated, unbiased opinion. I have absolutely no connection to gopicnic. Just a happy customer!

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Eating for Focus & Calm

by Simla on September 8, 2011

Author’s note and disclaimer:  This information is provided for educational purposes only. The recommendations included in this informational article are not to be construed as medical advice and do not take the place of medical advice. You should seek medical advice and continue to consult with your existing medical practitioners as needed. This article is not meant to formally and thoroughly address ADHD or ADD, but some of the common symptoms and root causes shared by those diagnosed with these conditions as well as those with general overwhelm.

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September is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) month. I decided to dedicate today’s article not just to those of you diagnosed with the increasingly common ADHD or ADD, but to all of you who have ever had extended periods of being unable to stay calm and focused on the task at hand.

There are many contributors to our increasing inability to get and stay focused, such as:

… and so on.

Today’s focus, however, is on what and how you can eat to neutralize feeling scattered, light-headed, anxious, distracted, confused, forgetful, apathetic, unproductive,… and any of the other ways in which “inability to focus” shows up for you.

The impact of food on attention span and feeling calm is considerable. Even after accounting for other stresses in your life, food plays a very large role in how you direct and control your focus and related moods – whether you’re aware of what you’re doing or not.

Here’s how to take control of your attention span and sense of calm on purpose:

1. Maintain healthy blood sugar levels

Here’s how: make sure all meals and snacks contain a balance of protein, complex carbohydrates, and healthy fats. Aim for at least 8-12 grams of protein with snacks, and at least 18-25 grams of protein with meals. Do not skip meals, ESPECIALLY breakfast.

Proteins include all animal foods, such as dairy, meat, seafood, and eggs; soy-based foods; legumes, and nuts.

2. Discover and address your food intolerances

If you have undiscovered food intolerances or ignore the ones you have, you are undoubtedly contributing to an overall burden on your body. Food intolerances may contribute directly or indirectly to your ability to focus and your sense of calm (or, conversely, anxiety and/or depression). Your call to action: request a food intolerance IgG (not IgE) test panel from your allergist or functional / integrative doctor, and follow up with a comprehensive elimination-challenge diet that is designed to also address all the other recommendations in this article. A good example is the Delicious Cleanse (click here to learn more).

3. Replenish your nutrient stores

It’s almost a guarantee that you have at least a few nutritional deficiencies. Why? Even if you “eat healthy,” our soil quality and the levels of nutrients we get from our foods has declined, we’re constantly bombarded by environmental toxins and many other stressors so our bodies just have a lot to contend with; ultimately, we get depleted. The best antidote is to eat a well-rounded diet based on real, whole foods with a large variety of vegetables. The next best antidote is to get a professionally designed, personalized supplement plan that you can use as a transitional measure to quickly alleviate existing deficiencies as you move towards improving your diet.

4. Cut down on the junk and processed foods

High fructose corn syrup, refined sugars, refined flours, sugar-added foods, diet foods, low-fat foods, colas / sodas, artificial sweeteners, flavorings, colors, additives, hormone-and-chemical-laden animal foods that come from conventionally raised animals. They can aggravate symptoms of ADHD and ADD, and cause agitation and inability to concentrate in those who are sensitive, AND further deplete your body’s reserves, compromising your body’s ability to function at its best.

Just say no.

5. Beware of caffeine

A small amount of caffeine has been shown to help improve concentration levels. But don’t get your hopes up. I’ve met very few people who use only a “small” amount of caffeine. Overuse and dependency on caffeine, which is by far more common, actually backfires and makes it harder to focus and concentrate. Even “just one cup” a day may be compromising your ability to focus and feel calm. So, proceed with caution. In fact, I recommend you quit. You’ll be in much better shape for the long run, in as little as 1-2 weeks.

Note that all of the above recommendations work best when done together but you’ll benefit even if you do just one.

Comment below and let me know which of these you try and how it goes…

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Want to share this article? You may, as long as you include the following blurb with it in its entirety:

Simla Somturk Wickless, MBA, CHC, CNE, is the founder of Delicious Health LLC. Simla is a health, nutrition, and balanced living coach whose mission is to transform Busy Bodies into healthy, Balanced beings TM. Simla loves working with women entrepreneurs, professionals, and autoimmune clients to help them double their energy, tame their stress, get to their natural weight without dieting, and take back control of their health to live intensely pleasurable and impactful lives. Learn more  at www.EnjoyDeliciousHealth.com or www.DeliciousHealthBlog.com

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Mediterranean Yogurt Salad

by Simla on September 7, 2011

This is a delicious, cooling dish we have often in my family, in particular during hot summer months. Very easy to prepare, and very Mediterranean in every sense of the word: flavor palate, health properties, seasonally appropriate. Fantastic as a side dish or snack.

It will help steady your focus and mood, boost your immunity, nurture you with rich, health-promoting vitamins and minerals, and provide cleansing elements to help you gently detoxify.

Mediterranean Yogurt Salad
Makes 4-6 servings.

Ingredients

1 – 1.5 cups full-fat organic “greek” yogurt (although this is a Turkish recipe – hah!)
1 garlic clove, peeled pressed finely using a garlic press
2 cups raw baby spinach leaves, rinsed and dried
(or better yet, to fit the original recipe: 2 cups purslane leaves if you can find them)
Sea salt, to taste

Directions

  1. Mix the yogurt and garlic.
  2. Fold in spinach (or purslane) leaves.
  3. Add sea salt, to taste.

Variations

Veggie & Chicken Stirfry with Coconut

by Simla on July 6, 2011

This recipe is easy, satisfying, and fun to make. The nutrients in these ingredients support healthy energy levels, proper hormone balance (including the adrenal and thyroid hormones), and help reverse the effects of stress on your body.

Easy Veggie & Chicken Stirfry with Coconut
Makes 2 servings

Ingredients

2 tsp coconut oil
8 oz. chicken breast meat cut into 1/2” strips
½ yellow onion, peeled and sliced into long crescents
½ TBS fresh gingerroot, finely diced
1 tsp chopped garlic
1 medium zucchini, sliced into 1/4” half moons
1/2 cup mushrooms of choice, sliced thinly
2 heaping TBS unsweetened shredded coconut
1 TBS sweet mirin (rice-based vinegar)
Black pepper, to taste
Wheat-free tamari sauce, to taste
[Note: If you are allergic or intolerant to soy, use a coconut-based amino sauce instead, like this one: http://www.coconutsecret.com/aminos2.html]

Directions

  1. Wash the vegetables and prepare as described above.
  2. Heat the coconut oil on medium heat for 1 minute in a medium sized skillet or wok.
  3. Add onion, garlic, and ginger and stir constantly over medium heat for 2 minutes until the onions begin turning translucent. Avoid burning the garlic.
  4. Add chicken and stir until all sides of meat are lightly browned, about 6-7 minutes.
  5. Add zucchini and stir for 2 minutes. You may want to add a splash of filtered water at this time to help steam the zucchini.
  6. Add mushrooms and stir for another 2 minutes
  7. Add coconut, mirin, and tamari sauce. Stir thoroughly.
  8. Check and see whether the chicken meat is fully opaque and cooked through. If so, you’re done.

Variations

Enjoy!

***

You may share this recipe freely as long as you include this complete paragraph with it:

This recipe is shared with you courtesy of Simla Somturk Wickless, MBA, CHC, CNE, founder of Delicious Health LLC. Simla is a health, nutrition, and balanced living coach whose mission is to transform Busy Bodies into healthy, Balanced beings TM. Simla loves working with women entrepreneurs, professionals, and autoimmune clients to help them double their energy, tame their stress, get to their natural weight without dieting, and take back control of their health to live intensely pleasurable and impactful lives. Learn more  at www.EnjoyDeliciousHealth.com or www.DeliciousHealthBlog.com.

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Could It Be Adrenal Fatigue?

by Simla on July 6, 2011

Author’s note and disclaimer:  This information is provided for educational purposes only. The recommendations included in this informational article are not to be construed as medical advice and do not take the place of medical advice. You should seek medical advice and continue to consult with your existing medical practitioners as needed.

***

Feel like you wake up tired, stay tired, then dip even more around 3-4 pm, push through the evening, then gratefully fall into bed? (And maybe even have trouble falling or staying asleep despite all that tired-ness?)

Cringe at the thought of giving up your coffee, for fear that you’d fall flat on your face?

Are you a slave to sugar and/or salt?

How about that Starbucks run or candy dish in the office you can’t resist around 3-4pm?

All of the above are linked to the health of your adrenal glands.

What if it I told you you can reverse all of that and become the master of your energy relatively easily with just a few changes in your daily food and self-care habits?

Why Should I Care About My Adrenal Glands?

In short:  because they’re tiny but have a huge job to do; because they are easily depleted by our fast lifestyles; and, because with tired adrenals, you get a lot of things you probably don’t want, including:  fatigue; weight gain; inability to focus; cravings; weakened immune system; sleep disorders; hormonal and mood imbalances.

Translation:  you feel fat, tired, irritable, down, rushed and yet unproductive, and have a bunch of annoying things going on in your body.

Sound familiar?

Personally, it took me 20 years of workaholism and perfectionist/overachiever tendencies and years of Nescafe and daily double-to-quadruple venti lattes to come down with severe adrenal fatigue at the age of 32, resulting in the need to sleep up to 20 hours a day for several months. Today, I am the master of my steady levels of energy, which give me so much more fuel for the non-perfectionist/non-workaholic life I now choose to lead. It’s a nice place to be. I share that not to brag, but to show you it’s entirely possible.

And What Are The Adrenal Glands, Anyway?

Your adrenal glands look like little triangular peanuts, with one situated on top of each kidney. They serve many functions, including but certainly nowhere near limited to:

See? They deserve more respect than you’re likely giving them.

The Many Faces of Adrenal Fatigue

Adrenal fatigue can run the gamut from very mild to life threatening. It’s safe to say that if you have a demanding, busy life and/or career, with some emotional stress thrown in, you have some level of adrenal fatigue.

Not sure? See if some of the common symptoms and effects of adrenal fatigue apply to you:

Adrenal fatigue can also contribute to autoimmune conditions such as fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and hypothyroid conditions, and lead to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome if left untreated.

Why is Adrenal Fatigue Often Under-Diagnosed?

Conventional medicine has only two formal diagnosis codes for adrenal imbalances, one for each of the two extremes on the spectrum of adrenal function: (1) Cushing Syndrome, when you are exposed to or produce too much cortisol, the body’s natural stress hormone or when you are exposed to too much cortisone, the synthetic version of cortisol often prescribed as an anti-inflammatory medication; and, (2) Addison’s Disease, when adrenals can no longer produce enough of their own hormones. Both can be life threatening. Not what we’re talking about here.

The problem is that most people fall somewhere in between, in the large gray zone on the spectrum of adrenal function. There are no conventional medical tests or even diagnosis codes or treatments in conventional medicine for this type of “invisible” adrenal fatigue. Appropriate lab tests and treatment protocols do exist in alternative medicine, however.

For now, however, I’m going to share with you easy steps you can take through your personal food and self-care habits to begin reversing any signs of adrenal fatigue.

Top 5 Ways to Begin Reversing Adrenal Fatigue

  1. Sleep has no substitute. You must rest if you are going to help your adrenals get stronger. That means going to bed every night by 10 p.m. and getting an ideal 8 hours of sleep per night. Make this a priority and stick with it. Your adrenals need their beauty sleep! Increase your sleep in 15 minute increments until you are at your 8 hours.
  2. Eliminate refined sugars and processed carbs such as white breads and pastas, candies, and baked goods. Sugar and simple carbs (junk!) put major stress on the adrenals.
  3. Eat clean animal proteins including ghee (clarified butter) in moderation as well as organic vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, beans and gluten-free whole grains.
  4. Quit the coffee/caffeine habit and drink plenty of fresh filtered water every day.
  5. Do NOT skip meals and be sure to have a strong, balanced breakfast with at least 10-15 grams of protein, whole grains, and healthy fats within 90 minutes of waking up. Healthy fats include Omega 3 fats such as from avocados, nuts and seeds, and wild fish, as well as moderate amounts of organic saturated fats such as from clean animal foods and 1-2 teaspoons of ghee (clarified butter) daily.

Remember: love your adrenals and they’ll love you back.

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Want to share this article? You may, as long as you include the following blurb with it in its entirety:

Simla Somturk Wickless, MBA, CHC, CNE, is the founder of Delicious Health LLC. Simla is a health, nutrition, and balanced living coach whose mission is to transform Busy Bodies into healthy, Balanced beings TM. Simla loves working with women entrepreneurs, professionals, and autoimmune clients to help them double their energy, tame their stress, get to their natural weight without dieting, and take back control of their health to live intensely pleasurable and impactful lives. Learn more  at www.EnjoyDeliciousHealth.com or www.DeliciousHealthBlog.com.

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